ID Defender – myEcon

Sunday, January 13th, 2019

Source: ID Defender – myEcon

Trump heads to California to see wildfire damage, meet with firefighters

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

President Trump surveyed the devastation from the California wildfires on Saturday, touring a neighborhood in badly-ravaged Paradise and another in Malibu, where the homes were reduced entirely to rubble.

“This is very sad to see,” Trump said as he stood with the governor, the mayor of Paradise and other local officials on a destroyed street in Paradise. “As far as the lives are concerned, nobody knows quite yet.”

“As big as they look on the tube you don’t see what’s going on until you come here,” Trump said of the scale of the destruction and the impact of seeing the damage in first person.

“Nobody would have ever thought this could have happened,” Trump said, as he pledged the full support of the federal government in the recovery efforts.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump arrives at Beale Air Force Base in California, Nov. 17, 2018, as he travels to view wildfire damage.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
President Donald Trump arrives at Beale Air Force Base in California, Nov. 17, 2018, as he travels to view wildfire damage.

Asked if seeing the destruction has changed his perspective on climate change, the president said it had not, and instead repeatedly pointed to forest management as a key factor in fire prevention moving forward.

“No, I have a strong opinion. I want a great climate and we’re going to have that,” Trump said. “And we’re going to have forests that are very safe. Because we can’t go through this every year.”

During a meeting with fire and local officials at an incident command center in Chico, the president referred to the fire as a “monster” and applauded firefighters who are “fighting like hell” to put out the remaining parts of the fires still burning.

PHOTO: Residences leveled by the wildfire line a neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018.Noah Berger/AP
Residences leveled by the wildfire line a neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018.

The raging wildfires have already claimed at least 74 lives and up to 1,000 people are still missing. The Camp Fire in Butte County, which killed at least 71 people, is considered the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in the state’s history.

When the president arrived in California beneath hazy, smoke-filled skies Saturday, he was greeted by FEMA Director Brock Long, Gov. Jerry Brown and the governor-elect, Gavin Newsom.

In a tweet, Brown, who has feuded with Trump on several issues, welcomed the president to his state.

“Tomorrow @GavinNewsom and I will join @POTUS during his visit to the state,” he tweeted Friday. “Now is a time to pull together for the people of California.”

Camp Fire
SLIDESHOW: Massive wildfires engulf California

‘)

Trump said he’ll be stopping at two of the most devastated areas, and applauded the firefighters for being “unbelievably brave” as they’ve battled the fires.

The president also reiterated his criticism — which first appeared as a tweet — that poor fire management is to blame for the severity of the fires, and pointed to Finland as an example of how to better maintain forests.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump views damage from wildfires in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
President Donald Trump views damage from wildfires in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.

“We do have to do management maintenance and we’ll be working also with environmental groups, I think everyone’s seen the light,” Trump said. “The floors of the forest are very important. You look at other countries where they do it differently and it’s a whole different story. I was with the president of Finland, and he said we have a much different — we’re a forest nation. He called it a forest nation. And they spend a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things and they don’t have any problem.”

Trump added that it could have been “a lot different situation” if we had been talking about forest management earlier. “It should have been done many years ago but I think everybody is on the right side. It’s a big issue,” he said.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump visits the charred wreckage of Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park with FEMA head Brock Long, right, in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.Leah Millis/Reuters
President Donald Trump visits the charred wreckage of Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park with FEMA head Brock Long, right, in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.

Though the president asserted that there is agreement on the issue of forest management, California officials, including a top-ranked fire official, have slammed his criticism. California Professional Firefighters President Brian Rice called Trump’s assertion of forest management “ill-informed, ill-timed and demeaning to those who are suffering as well as the men and women on the front lines.”

Trump heads to California to see wildfire damage, meet with firefighters

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

President Trump surveyed the devastation from the California wildfires on Saturday, touring a neighborhood in badly-ravaged Paradise and another in Malibu, where the homes were reduced entirely to rubble.

“This is very sad to see,” Trump said as he stood with the governor, the mayor of Paradise and other local officials on a destroyed street in Paradise. “As far as the lives are concerned, nobody knows quite yet.”

“As big as they look on the tube you don’t see what’s going on until you come here,” Trump said of the scale of the destruction and the impact of seeing the damage in first person.

“Nobody would have ever thought this could have happened,” Trump said, as he pledged the full support of the federal government in the recovery efforts.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump arrives at Beale Air Force Base in California, Nov. 17, 2018, as he travels to view wildfire damage.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
President Donald Trump arrives at Beale Air Force Base in California, Nov. 17, 2018, as he travels to view wildfire damage.

Asked if seeing the destruction has changed his perspective on climate change, the president said it had not, and instead repeatedly pointed to forest management as a key factor in fire prevention moving forward.

“No, I have a strong opinion. I want a great climate and we’re going to have that,” Trump said. “And we’re going to have forests that are very safe. Because we can’t go through this every year.”

During a meeting with fire and local officials at an incident command center in Chico, the president referred to the fire as a “monster” and applauded firefighters who are “fighting like hell” to put out the remaining parts of the fires still burning.

PHOTO: Residences leveled by the wildfire line a neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018.Noah Berger/AP
Residences leveled by the wildfire line a neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018.

The raging wildfires have already claimed at least 74 lives and up to 1,000 people are still missing. The Camp Fire in Butte County, which killed at least 71 people, is considered the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in the state’s history.

When the president arrived in California beneath hazy, smoke-filled skies Saturday, he was greeted by FEMA Director Brock Long, Gov. Jerry Brown and the governor-elect, Gavin Newsom.

In a tweet, Brown, who has feuded with Trump on several issues, welcomed the president to his state.

“Tomorrow @GavinNewsom and I will join @POTUS during his visit to the state,” he tweeted Friday. “Now is a time to pull together for the people of California.”

Camp Fire
SLIDESHOW: Massive wildfires engulf California

‘)

Trump said he’ll be stopping at two of the most devastated areas, and applauded the firefighters for being “unbelievably brave” as they’ve battled the fires.

The president also reiterated his criticism — which first appeared as a tweet — that poor fire management is to blame for the severity of the fires, and pointed to Finland as an example of how to better maintain forests.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump views damage from wildfires in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
President Donald Trump views damage from wildfires in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.

“We do have to do management maintenance and we’ll be working also with environmental groups, I think everyone’s seen the light,” Trump said. “The floors of the forest are very important. You look at other countries where they do it differently and it’s a whole different story. I was with the president of Finland, and he said we have a much different — we’re a forest nation. He called it a forest nation. And they spend a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things and they don’t have any problem.”

Trump added that it could have been “a lot different situation” if we had been talking about forest management earlier. “It should have been done many years ago but I think everybody is on the right side. It’s a big issue,” he said.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump visits the charred wreckage of Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park with FEMA head Brock Long, right, in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.Leah Millis/Reuters
President Donald Trump visits the charred wreckage of Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park with FEMA head Brock Long, right, in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.

Though the president asserted that there is agreement on the issue of forest management, California officials, including a top-ranked fire official, have slammed his criticism. California Professional Firefighters President Brian Rice called Trump’s assertion of forest management “ill-informed, ill-timed and demeaning to those who are suffering as well as the men and women on the front lines.”

Argentine submarine found at bottom of Atlantic after year of searching

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

An Argentine submarine that went missing almost exactly one year ago has been found at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

The Argentine Navy and Defense Ministry confirmed late Friday evening that the remains of the ARA San Juan submarine had been located in the south Atlantic Ocean at a depth of about 800 meters (approximately a half mile), about 700 miles due east of the Argentine city of Puerto Madryn.

The families of the 44 crew members who perished in the accident have been summoned to Mar del Plata Naval Base to be officially informed this weekend.

Officials in the South American country lost radio contact with the San Juan on Nov. 15, 2017 and were unable to locate the missing sub in following days and months.

The sub was discovered Friday by U.S. company Ocean Infinity, which was in charge of the search operation. The company sent out mini-submarines to the seabed and one returned with definitive photo evidence of the wreckage of the submarine. In the deal the Houston-based company made with the Argentine government, finding the wreckage of the submarine would trigger a payment of $7.5 million.

PHOTO: Antonio Niz, father of first Corporal Luis Niz, holds a collage of images of his son, a crew member of the missing ARA San Juan submarine, as family members stand outside Russias embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, Jan. 15, 2018.AP
Antonio Niz, father of first Corporal Luis Niz, holds a collage of images of his son, a crew member of the missing ARA San Juan submarine, as family members stand outside Russia’s embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, Jan. 15, 2018.

The same company struck a similar deal with the Malaysian government to find Malaysia Airlines flight 370 earlier this year — but came up empty in its search.

Utilizing the Norwegian ship Seabed Constructor, the 40-member team of specialists from Ocean Infinity set sail on Sept. 8 and were on their last day of work before heading back to port when they received indications of a 60-meter long wreckage or geological formation at a depth of 800 meters. They had already studied two dozen other such possibilities to no avail.

PHOTO: This undated photo provided by the Argentina Navy shows an ARA San Juan, a German-built diesel-electric vessel, docked in Buenos Aires, Argentina.Argentina Navy via AP
This undated photo provided by the Argentina Navy shows an ARA San Juan, a German-built diesel-electric vessel, docked in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Three personnel from the Argentine Navy and four persons representing the families were also on board Ocean Infinity’s search vessel. Luis Tagliapietra, father of missing crew member Alejandro, told ABC News just two days ago that he was tired and frustrated as the ship began to head back to port after over two months of searching.

Attempts at communication with Tagliapietra or other family members aboard the search vessel were unsuccessful on Friday night.

The federal judge investigating the San Juan accident, Marta Yáñez, was optimistic about the potential for research into the disaster with the newly discovered images: “It’s one thing to do guesswork, it’s a whole different matter to analyze the images we have so specialists can assess what really happened.”

PHOTO: Relatives of the ARA San Juan crew with hands chained look on during a protest in front of the Casa Rosada demanding the government to continue the search for the lost submarine on June 28, 2018 in Buenos Aires.Patrick Haar/Getty Images
Relatives of the ARA San Juan crew with hands chained look on during a protest in front of the Casa Rosada demanding the government to continue the search for the lost submarine on June 28, 2018 in Buenos Aires.

A number of naval officials are under investigation for allegedly allowing the submarine to go on an extended mission when they had been warned of mechanical problems that warranted immediate attention, according to testimony in federal court.

Adm. Marcelo Srur, the head of the Argentine Navy, was axed last December in the wake of the submarine going missing.

The ship was taking part in a military exercise at the time it lost contact, and had just seven days worth of oxygen on board.

Trump heads to California to see wildfire damage, meet with firefighters

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

President Trump surveyed the devastation from the California wildfires on Saturday, touring a neighborhood in badly-ravaged Paradise and another in Malibu, where the homes were reduced entirely to rubble.

“This is very sad to see,” Trump said as he stood with the governor, the mayor of Paradise and other local officials on a destroyed street in Paradise. “As far as the lives are concerned, nobody knows quite yet.”

“As big as they look on the tube you don’t see what’s going on until you come here,” Trump said of the scale of the destruction and the impact of seeing the damage in first person.

“Nobody would have ever thought this could have happened,” Trump said, as he pledged the full support of the federal government in the recovery efforts.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump arrives at Beale Air Force Base in California, Nov. 17, 2018, as he travels to view wildfire damage.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
President Donald Trump arrives at Beale Air Force Base in California, Nov. 17, 2018, as he travels to view wildfire damage.

Asked if seeing the destruction has changed his perspective on climate change, the president said it had not, and instead repeatedly pointed to forest management as a key factor in fire prevention moving forward.

“No, I have a strong opinion. I want a great climate and we’re going to have that,” Trump said. “And we’re going to have forests that are very safe. Because we can’t go through this every year.”

During a meeting with fire and local officials at an incident command center in Chico, the president referred to the fire as a “monster” and applauded firefighters who are “fighting like hell” to put out the remaining parts of the fires still burning.

PHOTO: Residences leveled by the wildfire line a neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018.Noah Berger/AP
Residences leveled by the wildfire line a neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018.

The raging wildfires have already claimed at least 74 lives and up to 1,000 people are still missing. The Camp Fire in Butte County, which killed at least 71 people, is considered the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in the state’s history.

When the president arrived in California beneath hazy, smoke-filled skies Saturday, he was greeted by FEMA Director Brock Long, Gov. Jerry Brown and the governor-elect, Gavin Newsom.

In a tweet, Brown, who has feuded with Trump on several issues, welcomed the president to his state.

“Tomorrow @GavinNewsom and I will join @POTUS during his visit to the state,” he tweeted Friday. “Now is a time to pull together for the people of California.”

Camp Fire
SLIDESHOW: Massive wildfires engulf California

‘)

Trump said he’ll be stopping at two of the most devastated areas, and applauded the firefighters for being “unbelievably brave” as they’ve battled the fires.

The president also reiterated his criticism — which first appeared as a tweet — that poor fire management is to blame for the severity of the fires, and pointed to Finland as an example of how to better maintain forests.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump views damage from wildfires in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
President Donald Trump views damage from wildfires in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.

“We do have to do management maintenance and we’ll be working also with environmental groups, I think everyone’s seen the light,” Trump said. “The floors of the forest are very important. You look at other countries where they do it differently and it’s a whole different story. I was with the president of Finland, and he said we have a much different — we’re a forest nation. He called it a forest nation. And they spend a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things and they don’t have any problem.”

Trump added that it could have been “a lot different situation” if we had been talking about forest management earlier. “It should have been done many years ago but I think everybody is on the right side. It’s a big issue,” he said.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump visits the charred wreckage of Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park with FEMA head Brock Long, right, in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.Leah Millis/Reuters
President Donald Trump visits the charred wreckage of Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park with FEMA head Brock Long, right, in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.

Though the president asserted that there is agreement on the issue of forest management, California officials, including a top-ranked fire official, have slammed his criticism. California Professional Firefighters President Brian Rice called Trump’s assertion of forest management “ill-informed, ill-timed and demeaning to those who are suffering as well as the men and women on the front lines.”

Even as a child Donald Trump was a horror | Daily Mail Online

Sunday, August 12th, 2018

According to Trump Revealed, a new biography compiled by Washington Post journalists who spoke to people who knew Trump as a child, he’s the same character now as when he was in junior school.

Source: Even as a child Donald Trump was a horror | Daily Mail Online

Watch: Donald Trump gives deposition on provocative rhetoric – YouTube

Sunday, August 12th, 2018

    The DONALD’S  Song and Dance!

RMVK Products Corner(SKin Care)

Wednesday, July 4th, 2018

Shop skin care products from a variety of skin care categories. Find different ways to care for skin and create a healthy glow using a variety of Amway products.