Florida governor race: Democrat Andrew Gillum concedes to Republican Ron DeSantis

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

Last
Updated Nov 17, 2018 10:57 PM EST

Florida Democratic candidate for governor Andrew Gillum officially conceded on Saturday to Republican Ron DeSantis, two days after a machine recount ended. The machine recount had DeSantis still leading by over 3,000 votes. 

The Tallahassee mayor congratulated DeSantis on becoming the next governor. In a Facebook video, Gillum didn’t say what his plans for the future are, but told his supporters to stay tuned.

DeSantis responded on Twitter, saying “This was a hard-fought campaign. Now it’s time to bring Florida together.”

Gillum conceded on Election Night, but retracted it after the margin of votes between him and DeSantis shrunk within the level of a legally required recount. 

Gillum won a surprise victory in the Democratic primary in August after running to the left of his opponents. He spent months as third in the polls and was outspent by his opponents. DeSantis, meanwhile, had been embraced by President Trump.

Mr. Trump earlier Saturday congratulated DeSantis on his victory, and called Gillum a “strong Democrat warrior long into the future – a force to reckon with!”

Mr. Trump had struck a different tone during the campaign, saying at a rally shortly before Election Day that Gillum is “a radical socialist … who will not do good things for Florida.” 

Former President Obama visited Florida to campaign for Gillum, giving a speech in Miami where he said the “character of the county” was on the line in the midterm elections.

This is a breaking story and will be updated. 

                © 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Portland police report weapons at demonstrations

Sunday, November 18th, 2018
A small protest called #HimToo organized by the far-right group Patriot Prayer was met by hundreds of counter-protesters in Portland on Saturday, CBS Portland affiliate KOIN reports. The protests were meant to be peaceful, but clashes began as the groups started to disperse.

Portland police said six people were arrested. 

Portland police tweeted around 5 p.m. PT that officers had observed demonstrators with weapons. “If demonstrators use weapons you are subject to citation, arrest and potentially use of force,” Portland police tweeted. 

Police also reported glass bottles being thrown. Tear gas and explosives went off as the crowd marched through the streets chanting “Nazis, go home!”  Police in riot gear arrived in various locations to keep the demonstrators on the sidewalks, KOIN reports. 

The Democratic Socialists of America on Portland held the first rally, which started around 11:30 a.m. Portland DSA tweeted they stand “with survivors and against oppressors. Fascists out of our city!”

“The only thing that beats fascists is a bigger crowd of anti-fascists,” said Portland DSA co-chair Emily Golden-Fields at the first rally of the day.   

They marched to Chapman Square, where they met up with the group Popular Mobilizations for a rally called #SupportersAreEverywhere, according to the Oregonian/OregonLive

These rallies ended around 1:30 p.m., while antifa supporters in their hoodies and black masks plus hundreds of others lingered along the sidewalks as the police repeatedly made loudspeaker announcements, KOIN reports.

These protests were meant to counter the rally scheduled for 2 p.m. across the street at Terry Schrunk Plaza called #HimToo, led by activists from the far-right group Patriot Prayer. 

At the #HimToo gathering, Joey Gibson and his Patriot Prayer acolyte Tusitala “Tiny” Toese spoke and danced. KOIN reports there were no more than 75 people at the demonstration.

“One of the things I think about most is equality,” Gibson said. “We believe everyone has an equal opportunity. We look into the allegations and the evidence.”

Various speakers made the argument that men are being constantly overshadowed and told their experiences don’t matter. Speaker Christopher Foster urged people to “join us in the fight for rights for men and accountability for women.”

Another speaker with a Southern accent told KOIN he drove all the way from Arkansas to speak at the #HimToo rally. While he said he did not prepare a speech, he railed against the “Democratic women cabal” and defended Roy Moore. 

Saturday’s protests were just three days after an ordiance aimed at regulating protests was shot down by the Portland City Council. Mayor Ted Wheeler proposed the ordiance to regulate the time, place and manner of protests that were expected to turn violent, KOIN reports

                © 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

“He was completely committed to going and doing this job”: Public funeral held for Utah mayor killed in Afghanistan

Sunday, November 18th, 2018
OGDEN, Utah — A Utah mayor killed while serving in the National Guard in Afghanistan had “loved the Afghan people” and was a man of conviction, confidence and compassion, family and military leaders said at a public funeral Saturday. Brent Taylor, 39, was killed Nov. 3 in an attack by one of the Afghan commandos he was training, military officials said. 

Taylor was a deeply patriotic man who was committed to training commandos as part of an effort to build the capacity of the Afghan national army, Utah Army National Guard Maj. Gen. Jefferson Burton said at the service inside an events center in the northern Utah city of Ogden.

“He was completely committed to going and doing this job,” Burton said. “He truly loved the Afghan people and wanted to help them so they could build capacity in themselves and as a nation to be able to stand on their own.”

Taylor’s casket was draped in an American flag and sat in front of a stage where his father, a local leader with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, led the services. 

ctm-1105-utah-mayor-brent-taylor.jpg

The choir sang “America the Beautiful” as the opening hymn and “Born to be a Soldier” to close in a nod to the service’s focus on Taylor’s love of country and commitment to sacrifice. 

His wife, Jennie, didn’t speak but has previously said the family felt “heartache but no regret” because Taylor was trying to bring freedom to others. 

Jennie Taylor told CBS Salt Lake City affiliate KUTV her late-husband’s sacrifice represents more than their family, it’s a moment for Americans to reflect. 

“This is an opportunity for Americans to pause and reflect on how blessed we are, how fortunate we are and the little things we take for granted and remember what matters most,” Jennie Taylor said.  

Jennie Taylor said the popular saying “freedom isn’t free” might be cliche, but for her, it rings true.

“Freedom isn’t free but it’s worth it and i hope that everyone who hears of this story, or has a fallen soldier, that all of us can feel we are part of something so much more,” Jennie Taylor told KUTV. “My biggest message, I think Brent’s biggest message, is we all try and do our part. Some gave all but all could give some.”

Besides his wife, Taylor leaves behind their seven children, ranging from 11 months to 13 years old. 

The memorial service capped off several days of events to honor Taylor.

Hundreds of soldiers saluted Taylor’s flag-covered casket Wednesday as his remains returned to a National Guard base in Salt Lake City. A couple hundred motorcycle riders carrying American flags followed the hearse north to Taylor’s hometown of North Ogden in a procession.

On Friday, a National Guard member stood guard over his casket during an all-night vigil at a mortuary. 

Utah Mayor Dead Afghanistan
Utah National Guard Honor Guard carry a casket containing the remains of Maj. Brent R. Taylor at the National Guard base Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018. in Salt Lake City. 

Matt Herp/Standard-Examiner, via, Pool)

Taylor had taken yearlong leave of absence as the mayor of North Ogden to go on his second tour to Afghanistan. Taylor, a military intelligence officer with Joint Force Headquarters, also had served two tours in Iraq. 

Younger brother Derek Taylor said Brent had a knack for bridging gaps and finding resolutions among people with different views – a talent he developed at the family home where fights and disagreements were frequent. He said his brother always ended their phone conversations with “Love ya, Derek.” 

He said his brother was blessed with “three Cs,” – commitment, confidence and compassion – and those were the driving force behind everything he accomplished.

“As a brother, Brent was as good as they come,” Derek Taylor said. “He was the best of all of us.”

Toby Mileski, a friend and former mayor of Pleasant View, a town neighboring North Ogden, remembered Taylor for his love of eating, his penchant for always running late and his good sense of humor.

“We were always laughing – always – and that’s one thing I’m really going to miss,” Mileski said, later adding, “Jennie, kids, your dad was a warrior, a patriot and a super person. I am honored and blessed have been able to call him my best friend.”

Trump talks to CIA and State leaders about Jamal Khashoggis killing

Sunday, November 18th, 2018
President Donald Trump spoke on Saturday with his CIA chief and top diplomat about the spy agency’s assessment of the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

The CIA has intelligence that substantiates an assessment that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, according to a U.S. official familiar with the intelligence. The official declined to characterize the confidence level of the CIA’s assessment. 

A separate U.S. official told CBS News Friday that U.S. intelligence has “high confidence” in its assessment that bin Salman ordered the killing — an assessment based on an understanding of how Saudi Arabia operates.

Neither official indicated that there is direct evidence linking bin Salman to the killing — including on the day of the incident.

On Saturday, Mr. Trump called CIA Director Gina Haspel and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from Air Force One as he flew to California to view wildfire damage, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. She provided no additional details but said the president has confidence in the CIA.

Mr. Trump told reporters before he left the White House that, when it came to the crown prince, “as of this moment we were told that he did not play a role. We’re going to have to find out what they have to say.”

In his remarks, the president spoke of Saudi Arabia as “a truly spectacular ally in terms of jobs and economic development.”

“I have to take a lot of things into consideration” when deciding what measures to take against the kingdom.

The intelligence agencies’ conclusion will bolster efforts in Congress to further punish the close U.S. ally for the killing. The Trump administration this past week penalized 17 Saudi officials for their alleged role in the killing, but American lawmakers have called on the administration to curtail arms sales to Saudi Arabia or take other harsher punitive measures.

Saudi Arabia’s top diplomat has said the crown prince had “absolutely” nothing to do with the killing.

Vice President Mike Pence told reporters traveling with him at a summit of Pacific Rim nations in Papua New Guinea that he could not comment on “classified information.” He said Saturday “the murder of Jamal Khashoggi was an atrocity. It was also an affront to a free and independent press, and the United States is determined to hold all of those accountable who are responsible for that murder.”

The United States will “follow the facts,” Pence said, while trying to find a way of preserving a “strong and historic partnership” with Saudi Arabia.

Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States, was a columnist for the Post and often criticized the royal family. He was killed Oct. 2 at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul. Turkish and Saudi authorities has said he was killed inside the consulate by a team from the kingdom after he went there to get marriage documents.

This past week, U.S. intelligence officials briefed members of the Senate and House intelligence committees, and the Treasury Department announced economic sanctions on 17 Saudi officials suspected of being responsible for or complicit in the killing. Also this past week, the top prosecutor in Saudi Arabia announced he will seek the death penalty against five men suspected in the killing. 

Mr. Trump has called the killing a botched operation that was carried out very poorly and has said “the cover-up was one of the worst cover-ups in the history of cover-ups.” But he has resisted calls to cut off arms sales to the kingdom and has been reluctant to antagonize the Saudi rulers. Mr. Trump considers the Saudis vital allies in his Mideast agenda.

                © 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Florida governor race: Democrat Andrew Gillum concedes to Republican Ron DeSantis

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

Last
Updated Nov 17, 2018 10:57 PM EST

Florida Democratic candidate for governor Andrew Gillum officially conceded on Saturday to Republican Ron DeSantis, two days after a machine recount ended. The machine recount had DeSantis still leading by over 3,000 votes. 

The Tallahassee mayor congratulated DeSantis on becoming the next governor. In a Facebook video, Gillum didn’t say what his plans for the future are, but told his supporters to stay tuned.

DeSantis responded on Twitter, saying “This was a hard-fought campaign. Now it’s time to bring Florida together.”

Gillum conceded on Election Night, but retracted it after the margin of votes between him and DeSantis shrunk within the level of a legally required recount. 

Gillum won a surprise victory in the Democratic primary in August after running to the left of his opponents. He spent months as third in the polls and was outspent by his opponents. DeSantis, meanwhile, had been embraced by President Trump.

Mr. Trump earlier Saturday congratulated DeSantis on his victory, and called Gillum a “strong Democrat warrior long into the future – a force to reckon with!”

Mr. Trump had struck a different tone during the campaign, saying at a rally shortly before Election Day that Gillum is “a radical socialist … who will not do good things for Florida.” 

Former President Obama visited Florida to campaign for Gillum, giving a speech in Miami where he said the “character of the county” was on the line in the midterm elections.

This is a breaking story and will be updated. 

                © 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Portland police report weapons at demonstrations

Sunday, November 18th, 2018
A small protest called #HimToo organized by the far-right group Patriot Prayer was met by hundreds of counter-protesters in Portland on Saturday, CBS Portland affiliate KOIN reports. The protests were meant to be peaceful, but clashes began as the groups started to disperse.

Portland police said six people were arrested. 

Portland police tweeted around 5 p.m. PT that officers had observed demonstrators with weapons. “If demonstrators use weapons you are subject to citation, arrest and potentially use of force,” Portland police tweeted. 

Police also reported glass bottles being thrown. Tear gas and explosives went off as the crowd marched through the streets chanting “Nazis, go home!”  Police in riot gear arrived in various locations to keep the demonstrators on the sidewalks, KOIN reports. 

The Democratic Socialists of America on Portland held the first rally, which started around 11:30 a.m. Portland DSA tweeted they stand “with survivors and against oppressors. Fascists out of our city!”

“The only thing that beats fascists is a bigger crowd of anti-fascists,” said Portland DSA co-chair Emily Golden-Fields at the first rally of the day.   

They marched to Chapman Square, where they met up with the group Popular Mobilizations for a rally called #SupportersAreEverywhere, according to the Oregonian/OregonLive

These rallies ended around 1:30 p.m., while antifa supporters in their hoodies and black masks plus hundreds of others lingered along the sidewalks as the police repeatedly made loudspeaker announcements, KOIN reports.

These protests were meant to counter the rally scheduled for 2 p.m. across the street at Terry Schrunk Plaza called #HimToo, led by activists from the far-right group Patriot Prayer. 

At the #HimToo gathering, Joey Gibson and his Patriot Prayer acolyte Tusitala “Tiny” Toese spoke and danced. KOIN reports there were no more than 75 people at the demonstration.

“One of the things I think about most is equality,” Gibson said. “We believe everyone has an equal opportunity. We look into the allegations and the evidence.”

Various speakers made the argument that men are being constantly overshadowed and told their experiences don’t matter. Speaker Christopher Foster urged people to “join us in the fight for rights for men and accountability for women.”

Another speaker with a Southern accent told KOIN he drove all the way from Arkansas to speak at the #HimToo rally. While he said he did not prepare a speech, he railed against the “Democratic women cabal” and defended Roy Moore. 

Saturday’s protests were just three days after an ordiance aimed at regulating protests was shot down by the Portland City Council. Mayor Ted Wheeler proposed the ordiance to regulate the time, place and manner of protests that were expected to turn violent, KOIN reports

                © 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

“He was completely committed to going and doing this job”: Public funeral held for Utah mayor killed in Afghanistan

Sunday, November 18th, 2018
OGDEN, Utah — A Utah mayor killed while serving in the National Guard in Afghanistan had “loved the Afghan people” and was a man of conviction, confidence and compassion, family and military leaders said at a public funeral Saturday. Brent Taylor, 39, was killed Nov. 3 in an attack by one of the Afghan commandos he was training, military officials said. 

Taylor was a deeply patriotic man who was committed to training commandos as part of an effort to build the capacity of the Afghan national army, Utah Army National Guard Maj. Gen. Jefferson Burton said at the service inside an events center in the northern Utah city of Ogden.

“He was completely committed to going and doing this job,” Burton said. “He truly loved the Afghan people and wanted to help them so they could build capacity in themselves and as a nation to be able to stand on their own.”

Taylor’s casket was draped in an American flag and sat in front of a stage where his father, a local leader with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, led the services. 

ctm-1105-utah-mayor-brent-taylor.jpg

The choir sang “America the Beautiful” as the opening hymn and “Born to be a Soldier” to close in a nod to the service’s focus on Taylor’s love of country and commitment to sacrifice. 

His wife, Jennie, didn’t speak but has previously said the family felt “heartache but no regret” because Taylor was trying to bring freedom to others. 

Jennie Taylor told CBS Salt Lake City affiliate KUTV her late-husband’s sacrifice represents more than their family, it’s a moment for Americans to reflect. 

“This is an opportunity for Americans to pause and reflect on how blessed we are, how fortunate we are and the little things we take for granted and remember what matters most,” Jennie Taylor said.  

Jennie Taylor said the popular saying “freedom isn’t free” might be cliche, but for her, it rings true.

“Freedom isn’t free but it’s worth it and i hope that everyone who hears of this story, or has a fallen soldier, that all of us can feel we are part of something so much more,” Jennie Taylor told KUTV. “My biggest message, I think Brent’s biggest message, is we all try and do our part. Some gave all but all could give some.”

Besides his wife, Taylor leaves behind their seven children, ranging from 11 months to 13 years old. 

The memorial service capped off several days of events to honor Taylor.

Hundreds of soldiers saluted Taylor’s flag-covered casket Wednesday as his remains returned to a National Guard base in Salt Lake City. A couple hundred motorcycle riders carrying American flags followed the hearse north to Taylor’s hometown of North Ogden in a procession.

On Friday, a National Guard member stood guard over his casket during an all-night vigil at a mortuary. 

Utah Mayor Dead Afghanistan
Utah National Guard Honor Guard carry a casket containing the remains of Maj. Brent R. Taylor at the National Guard base Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018. in Salt Lake City. 

Matt Herp/Standard-Examiner, via, Pool)

Taylor had taken yearlong leave of absence as the mayor of North Ogden to go on his second tour to Afghanistan. Taylor, a military intelligence officer with Joint Force Headquarters, also had served two tours in Iraq. 

Younger brother Derek Taylor said Brent had a knack for bridging gaps and finding resolutions among people with different views – a talent he developed at the family home where fights and disagreements were frequent. He said his brother always ended their phone conversations with “Love ya, Derek.” 

He said his brother was blessed with “three Cs,” – commitment, confidence and compassion – and those were the driving force behind everything he accomplished.

“As a brother, Brent was as good as they come,” Derek Taylor said. “He was the best of all of us.”

Toby Mileski, a friend and former mayor of Pleasant View, a town neighboring North Ogden, remembered Taylor for his love of eating, his penchant for always running late and his good sense of humor.

“We were always laughing – always – and that’s one thing I’m really going to miss,” Mileski said, later adding, “Jennie, kids, your dad was a warrior, a patriot and a super person. I am honored and blessed have been able to call him my best friend.”

“He was completely committed to going and doing this job”: Public funeral held for Utah mayor killed in Afghanistan

Sunday, November 18th, 2018
OGDEN, Utah — A Utah mayor killed while serving in the National Guard in Afghanistan had “loved the Afghan people” and was a man of conviction, confidence and compassion, family and military leaders said at a public funeral Saturday. Brent Taylor, 39, was killed Nov. 3 in an attack by one of the Afghan commandos he was training, military officials said. 

Taylor was a deeply patriotic man who was committed to training commandos as part of an effort to build the capacity of the Afghan national army, Utah Army National Guard Maj. Gen. Jefferson Burton said at the service inside an events center in the northern Utah city of Ogden.

“He was completely committed to going and doing this job,” Burton said. “He truly loved the Afghan people and wanted to help them so they could build capacity in themselves and as a nation to be able to stand on their own.”

Taylor’s casket was draped in an American flag and sat in front of a stage where his father, a local leader with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, led the services. 

ctm-1105-utah-mayor-brent-taylor.jpg

The choir sang “America the Beautiful” as the opening hymn and “Born to be a Soldier” to close in a nod to the service’s focus on Taylor’s love of country and commitment to sacrifice. 

His wife, Jennie, didn’t speak but has previously said the family felt “heartache but no regret” because Taylor was trying to bring freedom to others. 

Jennie Taylor told CBS Salt Lake City affiliate KUTV her late-husband’s sacrifice represents more than their family, it’s a moment for Americans to reflect. 

“This is an opportunity for Americans to pause and reflect on how blessed we are, how fortunate we are and the little things we take for granted and remember what matters most,” Jennie Taylor said.  

Jennie Taylor said the popular saying “freedom isn’t free” might be cliche, but for her, it rings true.

“Freedom isn’t free but it’s worth it and i hope that everyone who hears of this story, or has a fallen soldier, that all of us can feel we are part of something so much more,” Jennie Taylor told KUTV. “My biggest message, I think Brent’s biggest message, is we all try and do our part. Some gave all but all could give some.”

Besides his wife, Taylor leaves behind their seven children, ranging from 11 months to 13 years old. 

The memorial service capped off several days of events to honor Taylor.

Hundreds of soldiers saluted Taylor’s flag-covered casket Wednesday as his remains returned to a National Guard base in Salt Lake City. A couple hundred motorcycle riders carrying American flags followed the hearse north to Taylor’s hometown of North Ogden in a procession.

On Friday, a National Guard member stood guard over his casket during an all-night vigil at a mortuary. 

Utah Mayor Dead Afghanistan
Utah National Guard Honor Guard carry a casket containing the remains of Maj. Brent R. Taylor at the National Guard base Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018. in Salt Lake City. 

Matt Herp/Standard-Examiner, via, Pool)

Taylor had taken yearlong leave of absence as the mayor of North Ogden to go on his second tour to Afghanistan. Taylor, a military intelligence officer with Joint Force Headquarters, also had served two tours in Iraq. 

Younger brother Derek Taylor said Brent had a knack for bridging gaps and finding resolutions among people with different views – a talent he developed at the family home where fights and disagreements were frequent. He said his brother always ended their phone conversations with “Love ya, Derek.” 

He said his brother was blessed with “three Cs,” – commitment, confidence and compassion – and those were the driving force behind everything he accomplished.

“As a brother, Brent was as good as they come,” Derek Taylor said. “He was the best of all of us.”

Toby Mileski, a friend and former mayor of Pleasant View, a town neighboring North Ogden, remembered Taylor for his love of eating, his penchant for always running late and his good sense of humor.

“We were always laughing – always – and that’s one thing I’m really going to miss,” Mileski said, later adding, “Jennie, kids, your dad was a warrior, a patriot and a super person. I am honored and blessed have been able to call him my best friend.”

“He was completely committed to going and doing this job”: Public funeral held for Utah mayor killed in Afghanistan

Sunday, November 18th, 2018
OGDEN, Utah — A Utah mayor killed while serving in the National Guard in Afghanistan had “loved the Afghan people” and was a man of conviction, confidence and compassion, family and military leaders said at a public funeral Saturday. Brent Taylor, 39, was killed Nov. 3 in an attack by one of the Afghan commandos he was training, military officials said. 

Taylor was a deeply patriotic man who was committed to training commandos as part of an effort to build the capacity of the Afghan national army, Utah Army National Guard Maj. Gen. Jefferson Burton said at the service inside an events center in the northern Utah city of Ogden.

“He was completely committed to going and doing this job,” Burton said. “He truly loved the Afghan people and wanted to help them so they could build capacity in themselves and as a nation to be able to stand on their own.”

Taylor’s casket was draped in an American flag and sat in front of a stage where his father, a local leader with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, led the services. 

ctm-1105-utah-mayor-brent-taylor.jpg

The choir sang “America the Beautiful” as the opening hymn and “Born to be a Soldier” to close in a nod to the service’s focus on Taylor’s love of country and commitment to sacrifice. 

His wife, Jennie, didn’t speak but has previously said the family felt “heartache but no regret” because Taylor was trying to bring freedom to others. 

Jennie Taylor told CBS Salt Lake City affiliate KUTV her late-husband’s sacrifice represents more than their family, it’s a moment for Americans to reflect. 

“This is an opportunity for Americans to pause and reflect on how blessed we are, how fortunate we are and the little things we take for granted and remember what matters most,” Jennie Taylor said.  

Jennie Taylor said the popular saying “freedom isn’t free” might be cliche, but for her, it rings true.

“Freedom isn’t free but it’s worth it and i hope that everyone who hears of this story, or has a fallen soldier, that all of us can feel we are part of something so much more,” Jennie Taylor told KUTV. “My biggest message, I think Brent’s biggest message, is we all try and do our part. Some gave all but all could give some.”

Besides his wife, Taylor leaves behind their seven children, ranging from 11 months to 13 years old. 

The memorial service capped off several days of events to honor Taylor.

Hundreds of soldiers saluted Taylor’s flag-covered casket Wednesday as his remains returned to a National Guard base in Salt Lake City. A couple hundred motorcycle riders carrying American flags followed the hearse north to Taylor’s hometown of North Ogden in a procession.

On Friday, a National Guard member stood guard over his casket during an all-night vigil at a mortuary. 

Utah Mayor Dead Afghanistan
Utah National Guard Honor Guard carry a casket containing the remains of Maj. Brent R. Taylor at the National Guard base Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018. in Salt Lake City. 

Matt Herp/Standard-Examiner, via, Pool)

Taylor had taken yearlong leave of absence as the mayor of North Ogden to go on his second tour to Afghanistan. Taylor, a military intelligence officer with Joint Force Headquarters, also had served two tours in Iraq. 

Younger brother Derek Taylor said Brent had a knack for bridging gaps and finding resolutions among people with different views – a talent he developed at the family home where fights and disagreements were frequent. He said his brother always ended their phone conversations with “Love ya, Derek.” 

He said his brother was blessed with “three Cs,” – commitment, confidence and compassion – and those were the driving force behind everything he accomplished.

“As a brother, Brent was as good as they come,” Derek Taylor said. “He was the best of all of us.”

Toby Mileski, a friend and former mayor of Pleasant View, a town neighboring North Ogden, remembered Taylor for his love of eating, his penchant for always running late and his good sense of humor.

“We were always laughing – always – and that’s one thing I’m really going to miss,” Mileski said, later adding, “Jennie, kids, your dad was a warrior, a patriot and a super person. I am honored and blessed have been able to call him my best friend.”

Trump talks to CIA and State leaders about Jamal Khashoggis killing

Sunday, November 18th, 2018
President Donald Trump spoke on Saturday with his CIA chief and top diplomat about the spy agency’s assessment of the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

The CIA has intelligence that substantiates an assessment that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, according to a U.S. official familiar with the intelligence. The official declined to characterize the confidence level of the CIA’s assessment. 

A separate U.S. official told CBS News Friday that U.S. intelligence has “high confidence” in its assessment that bin Salman ordered the killing — an assessment based on an understanding of how Saudi Arabia operates.

Neither official indicated that there is direct evidence linking bin Salman to the killing — including on the day of the incident.

On Saturday, Mr. Trump called CIA Director Gina Haspel and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from Air Force One as he flew to California to view wildfire damage, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. She provided no additional details but said the president has confidence in the CIA.

Mr. Trump told reporters before he left the White House that, when it came to the crown prince, “as of this moment we were told that he did not play a role. We’re going to have to find out what they have to say.”

In his remarks, the president spoke of Saudi Arabia as “a truly spectacular ally in terms of jobs and economic development.”

“I have to take a lot of things into consideration” when deciding what measures to take against the kingdom.

The intelligence agencies’ conclusion will bolster efforts in Congress to further punish the close U.S. ally for the killing. The Trump administration this past week penalized 17 Saudi officials for their alleged role in the killing, but American lawmakers have called on the administration to curtail arms sales to Saudi Arabia or take other harsher punitive measures.

Saudi Arabia’s top diplomat has said the crown prince had “absolutely” nothing to do with the killing.

Vice President Mike Pence told reporters traveling with him at a summit of Pacific Rim nations in Papua New Guinea that he could not comment on “classified information.” He said Saturday “the murder of Jamal Khashoggi was an atrocity. It was also an affront to a free and independent press, and the United States is determined to hold all of those accountable who are responsible for that murder.”

The United States will “follow the facts,” Pence said, while trying to find a way of preserving a “strong and historic partnership” with Saudi Arabia.

Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States, was a columnist for the Post and often criticized the royal family. He was killed Oct. 2 at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul. Turkish and Saudi authorities has said he was killed inside the consulate by a team from the kingdom after he went there to get marriage documents.

This past week, U.S. intelligence officials briefed members of the Senate and House intelligence committees, and the Treasury Department announced economic sanctions on 17 Saudi officials suspected of being responsible for or complicit in the killing. Also this past week, the top prosecutor in Saudi Arabia announced he will seek the death penalty against five men suspected in the killing. 

Mr. Trump has called the killing a botched operation that was carried out very poorly and has said “the cover-up was one of the worst cover-ups in the history of cover-ups.” But he has resisted calls to cut off arms sales to the kingdom and has been reluctant to antagonize the Saudi rulers. Mr. Trump considers the Saudis vital allies in his Mideast agenda.

                © 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.