At least 7 dead as snow wreaks havoc on East Coast

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

A fall snowstorm wreaked havoc on the East Coast, stranding New York City commuters, canceling more than 7,000 flights, knocking out power to more than 300,000 residents and forcing children to stay at school overnight.

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The chaos

The rough weather has contributed to at least seven deaths in the U.S., The Associated Press said.

In Connecticut, a man was shoveling snow off his car on Interstate-95 when another car spun out of control and hit him, the state police said.

The snow, sleet and rain caused chaos on roadways across the Northeast, especially during the evening commute.

New Jersey State Police said they responded to over 500 crashes on Thursday while Maryland State Police said they responded to over 400 crashes.

In New Jersey, some students from Liberty Middle School had to sleep at their school in West Orange after the storm kept them from getting home Thursday.

Dad James Bondurant told ABC New York station WABC he was “very worried, scared. But once they assured me the kids were safe, it was better for them to be in the school than have to come get them.”

He added, “It was too crazy. The cars were abandoned, the traffic was crazy. Just a mess.”

Bondurant’s son, 13-year-old Isaiah, told WABC he was “very worried. I called my dad, like, multiple times!”

The school tweeted photos of the students’ activities during their unexpected sleepover, from late-night ice cream to early morning French toast.

One student told WABC she had trouble sleeping. But she added, “I was worried for my dad because I heard there was a lot of crashes, so I didn’t want him to come.”

The middle schoolers made it home by Friday morning, reported WABC.

One of New York City’s biggest commuter hubs, the Port Authority Bus Terminal, closed on Thursday when it ran out of room, stranding snow-soaked commuters trying to get home to New Jersey.

The terminal has since re-opened.

Massive snow totals

New York City got a whopping six inches of snow, the biggest one-day snow total for the city in November since the late 1800s.

Philadelphia saw 3.6 inches, its biggest storm since 1967.

Other snow totals:

Mount Hope, New York: 18.3 inches
Newton, Pennsylvania: 12.3 inches
Montague, New Jersey: 10.2 inches
New Fairfield, Connecticut: 10 inches
Burrillville, Rhode Island: 9 inches

The aftermath

NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan called Thursday “one of the most challenging nights I’ve ever seen with the way traffic hit, especially in the Bronx and Manhattan.”

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said a 20-car pileup on the George Washington Bridge caused a ripple effect that spread throughout New York City and New Jersey.

PHOTO: Cars pause at a light as a wintry mix of snow, rain and ice fall during the evening commute in Manhattan on Nov. 15, 2018 in New York.Spencer Platt/Getty Images
Cars pause at a light as a wintry mix of snow, rain and ice fall during the evening commute in Manhattan on Nov. 15, 2018 in New York.

New York City saw a 79 percent increase in 911 calls Thursday and a 162 percent increase in collisions, said Monahan. 

It was a “horrible experience” and “the perfect storm,” New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio told local news channel NY1 on Friday.

De Blasio on Friday afternoon promised a full review of the city’s handling of the storm.

PHOTO: A tree collapsed on top of a parked car in Manhattan on Nov. 15, 2018 in New York.Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images
A tree collapsed on top of a parked car in Manhattan on Nov. 15, 2018 in New York.
PHOTO: A young girl brushes off snow on the Fearless Girl statue in lower Manhattan on Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in New York. One of the first big storms of the season moved across the eastern half of the country on Thursday. AP
A young girl brushes off snow on the Fearless Girl statue in lower Manhattan on Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018, in New York. One of the first big storms of the season moved across the eastern half of the country on Thursday.

De Blasio told reporters that he shares New Yorkers’ frustration with the storm, but said that he doesn’t think it’s fair to blame the city agencies.

The mayor said there was no indication that the storm was going to dump more than one to three inches of snow until about 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, and that at that point it was too late and difficult to get information out to New Yorkers.

PHOTO: Workers inspect rail lines along Route 440 following a snowstorm, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018, in Jersey City, N.J.Julio Cortez/AP
Workers inspect rail lines along Route 440 following a snowstorm, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018, in Jersey City, N.J.
PHOTO: A woman waits with a child for a school bus the morning following a snowstorm, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018, in Metuchen, N.J.Julio Cortez/AP
A woman waits with a child for a school bus the morning following a snowstorm, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018, in Metuchen, N.J.

New York City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia said the agency was planning for one inch of snow, which would not have necessitated plows on the roads. However, by the time they recognized the full scope of the storm, all 700 salt and sand spreaders and between 350 to 700 of the city’s 1,600 plows were out.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

ABC News’ Aaron Katersky contributed to this report.

Slain journalist Khashoggi remembered in funeral service as controversy continues

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

Friends and family of slain Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi gathered in the rain at Istanbul’s Fatih Mosque, one of the city’s oldest and most magnificent, to conduct funeral prayers over a bier that remained symbolically empty.

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More than a month after the writer’s murder inside the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2, his remains have yet to be found by investigators, so prayers were held “in absentia.”

Istanbul newspaper Hurriyet reported on Friday that Turkish authorities claimed to have an audio recording with a detailed discussion by members of the alleged assassination team about how they were planning to execute Khashoggi, 15 minutes before he arrived at the Saudi consulate building.

PHOTO: Muslims gather around the Kaaba, Islams holiest shrine, to take part in the absentee funeral prayer for Saudi journalist Jamaal Khashoggi, at the Grand Mosque in Saudi Arabias holy city of Mecca on Nov. 16, 2018.Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images
Muslims gather around the Kaaba, Islam’s holiest shrine, to take part in the absentee funeral prayer for Saudi journalist Jamaal Khashoggi, at the Grand Mosque in Saudi Arabia’s holy city of Mecca on Nov. 16, 2018.

Turkish officials said assertions from Saudi Arabia that Khashoggi was killed after a botched kidnap attempt are contradictory to what is on the recordings, and said the writer was brutally strangled before he died, Hurriyet reported.

A day earlier, Saudi Arabia’s lead prosecutor, Saud al-Mojeb announced that 11 people have been indicted in connection with the murder, with five of those facing the death penalty if convicted. The prosecutor also revealed there are a further 10 suspects in custody in Saudi jails who have not yet been charged.

PHOTO: Salah Khashoggi, son of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, hugs a man offering condolences in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Nov. 16, 2018.Waleed Ali/Reuters
Salah Khashoggi, son of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, hugs a man offering condolences in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Nov. 16, 2018.

During the press conference, al-Mojeb said there was a struggle, during which Khashoggi was killed by lethal injection. Afterward, the prosecutor said, his body was cut up and taken out of the building. The journalist’s remains were then taken by someone outside the consulate grounds, he said. The identity of the outside collaborator, in addition to the location of Khashoggi’s body, remains unknown.

The announcement failed to appease Turkish officials. Turkey‘s foreign minister, Mevlut Cavusoglu, said the Saudi indictments fell short of Ankara’s expectations, according to the Associated Press.

Cavusoglu also insisted that the suspects detained in Saudi Arabia over Khashoggi’s killing should be put on trial in Turkey, according to the AP, and that Riyadh should reveal who ordered the killing.

PHOTO: Salah Khashoggi, son of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, receives condolences from Ryan M. Gliha, Consul General of the U.S. consulate, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Nov. 16, 2018.Waleed Ali/Reuters
Salah Khashoggi, son of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, receives condolences from Ryan M. Gliha, Consul General of the U.S. consulate, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Nov. 16, 2018.

“I want to say that we did not find some of his explanations to be satisfactory,” Cavusoglu said, according to the AP, adding that “those who gave the order, the real perpetrators, need to be revealed. This process cannot be closed down in this way.”

Khashoggi was a high-profile critic of Saudi policy and especially the Kingdom’s de-facto ruler, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. He had an appointment at the consulate to apply for paperwork that would have allowed him to marry his Turkish fiancé.

Migrants wont see armed soldiers on border

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

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As thousands of migrants in a caravan of Central American asylum-seekers converge on the doorstep of the United States, what they won’t find are armed American soldiers standing guard.

Instead they will see cranes installing towering panels of metal bars and troops wrapping concertina wire around barriers while military helicopters fly overhead, carrying border patrol agents to and from locations along the U.S.-Mexico border.

That’s because U.S. military troops are prohibited from carrying out law enforcement duties.

What’s more, the bulk of the troops are in Texas — hundreds of miles away from the caravan that started arriving this week in Tijuana on Mexico’s border with California after walking and hitching rides for the past month.

Still, for many migrants the barriers and barbed wire were an imposing show of force.

Angel Ulloa stood on Tijuana’s beach where a wall of metal bars more than 20 feet high cut across the sand and plunged into the Pacific. He watched as crews on the U.S. side placed coils of barbed wire on top.

A border patrol agent wearing camouflage and armed with an assault rifle — part of a tactical unit deployed when there is a heightened threat — walked in the sand below where the men worked. A small border patrol boat hovered offshore.

“It’s too much security to confront humble people who just want to work,” said Ulloa, a 23-year-old electrician from Choloma, Honduras, who joined the caravan to try to make his first trip to the U.S.

Now, he and his two friends were rethinking their plans. They tried to apply for a job at a Wal-Mart in Tijuana but were told they need a Mexican work permit. So they were considering seeking asylum in Mexico but were unsure of giving up their dream of earning dollars.

“We’re still checking things out,” he said.

On Friday, people walking through one of the world’s busiest border crossings into Mexico passed by a pair of Marines on a 20-foot lift installing razor wire above a turnstile.

Nearby Army Sgt. Eric Zeigler stood guard with another soldier. Both were military police officers assigned to protecting the Marines as they work.

The 24-year-old soldier from Pittsburgh spent nine months in Afghanistan. “”It’s very different over there, obviously. It’s a lot more dangerous,” Zeigler said.

He said he was surprised when got his deployment orders sending him to the U.S.-Mexico border.

“But I’m happy to go where I’m needed” he added as a man walked by carrying shopping bags headed to Tijuana.

The U.S. military has deployed 5,800 active-duty troops to the U.S.-Mexico border.

So far, more are not expected, despite President Donald Trump’s initial assessment that 10,000 to 15,000 were needed to secure the border against what he has called an “invasion” of migrants. Most in the caravan of several thousand are families, including hundreds of children.

Another 2,100 National Guard troops are have also been deployed since April as part of a separate mission. Like the military troops, they are not allowed to detain illegal crossers. Instead, they have been monitoring cameras and helping to erect barriers.

Of the 5,800 soldiers and Marines, more than 2,800 are in Texas, while about 1,500 are in Arizona and another 1,300 are in California. All U.S. military branches, except the Coast Guard, are barred from performing law enforcement duties.

That means there will be no visible show of armed troops, said Army Maj. Scott McCullough, adding that the mission is to provide support to Customs and Border Protection.

“Soldiers putting up wire on the border and barriers at the ports of entry will be the most visible,” he said.

Marines and soldiers share the same duties in California and Arizona. These include erecting tents, setting up showers and arranging meals for troops working on the border, and assigning military police to protect them.

There are no tents or camps being set up to house migrants, McCullough said. Medics are on hand to treat troops and border patrol agents — not migrants — for cuts, bruises and any other problems.

Combat engineers — whose duties on the battlefield include setting up tactical obstacles to prevent the enemy from moving freely — are using their expertise to string wire on border walls and erect temporary fencing, McCullough said.

Construction engineers have been assigned to weld together barriers and move shipping containers to act as walls.

In Laredo, Texas, about 100 soldiers have been installing three layers of razor wire along the Rio Grande, working on the banks during the day and on the bridges at night to minimize the disruption to cross-border traffic.

The current mission is scheduled to end Dec. 15 for now. It’s unclear how much it will cost and military leaders have refused to provide an estimate.

Critics have questioned the wisdom of using the military on the border where there is no discernible security threat. Since the Nov. 6 elections, Trump has said little about the matter and no border threat has materialized.

Some border communities fear the barricades will scare off Mexican shoppers. The city council in Nogales, Arizona, slashed a proposed bonus for all employees in half over concerns about how the military’s presence would affect its sales tax revenue after the military closed off two lanes at its border crossing.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis defended the deployment during a visit to the Texas border this week, asserting that in some ways it provides good training for war.

Suyapa Reyes, 35, said she was puzzled as to why she would be seen as a threat. Reyes, her mother, 12-year-old daughter and 16-year-old son left Honduras with the caravan on Oct. 13, fleeing violence and poverty in her hometown of Olanchito de Oro.

She does not want to return after coming such a long way but if she cannot get asylum and the border looks too dangerous to cross, she said she’ll have no other choice.

“I’m not going to risk my life or safety nor that of my children,” she said.

———

Associated Press writer Astrid Galvan in Phoenix contributed to this report.

———

This story corrects the spelling of Army Sgt. Eric Zeigler’s last name. It is Zeigler, not Ziegler.

Trump says he should have gone to Arlington on Veterans Day

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

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President Donald Trump says he should have visited Arlington National Cemetery to commemorate Veterans Day — a traditional presidential act.

Trump, who rarely admits a faux pas, told “Fox News Sunday” that “in retrospect, I should have” gone, but he was busy on calls and had just returned from abroad.

Trump was criticized for canceling a trip to an American cemetery in France on Saturday after his helicopter was grounded by bad weather. He was in Paris for ceremonies marking the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. He visited another U.S. cemetery before leaving Paris.

Trump tells Fox that he went to Arlington on Veterans Day last year. But while Trump has been to Arlington, he was in Asia on Veterans Day last year.

Betsy DeVos pitching new protections for students accused of sexual assault

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

The Trump administration on Friday proposed new rules for schools dealing with sexual assault and harassment allegations that would narrow the definition of sexual harassment and offer greater protections for those accused of wrongdoing.

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The move to rework guidelines put in place during the Obama administration is aimed at college campuses and universities, where one in four women who are seniors say they have experienced unwanted and nonconsensual sexual contact since entering college, according to the latest government survey.

The administration’s approach, led by the Education Department under Secretary Betsy DeVos, comes in the era of #MeToo, in which victims’ rights groups have said more should be done to protect survivors of sexual assault and to encourage women to speak up against harassment.

“Every survivor of sexual violence must be taken seriously, and every student accused of sexual misconduct must know that guilt is not predetermined,” DeVos said in a statement.

“We can, and must, condemn sexual violence and punish those who perpetrate it while ensuring a fair grievance process,” she added. “Those are not mutually exclusive ideas. They are the very essence of how Americans understand justice to function.”

The rules, once posted online, are subject to public comment for 60 days. Depending upon the public’s response, the Education Department will decide whether to make the rules final.

PHOTO: Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies during a Senate Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations hearing in Washington, D.C, June 5, 2018.Carolyn Kaster/AP
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos testifies during a Senate Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations hearing in Washington, D.C, June 5, 2018.

A small group of mens’ rights groups have pushed for the changes, contending that schools have gone too far and provided little due process to the accused. That criticism has resonated with several White House supporters, including President Donald Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr., who has said he’s more worried about his sons than to his daughters in the #MeToo era.

Cynthia P. Garrett, co-president of a group called “Families Advocating for Campus Equality,” said she’s been pushing for many of the changes included in the latest proposal because they give students accused of misconduct better opportunities to defend themselves. She said most campus sexual misconduct cases she’s seen “involve the lack of affirmative consent, regretted sex, not life-threatening, criminal conduct.”

The proposal got an immediate nod from a top Senate Republican who oversees education issues. Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee said in a statement that “the department’s approach seems to balance fairness and support for survivors.”

But women’s rights groups are pushing back.

They argue the new approach would unfairly tilt investigations in favor of the perpetrator and dramatically reduce the number of women willing to come forward. They contend the new rules would encourage colleges and universities to become more complacent when it comes to addressing allegations of sexual misconduct.

Fatima Goss Graves, head of the National Women’s Law Center, said the new rules would radically weaken federal oversight of colleges responding to campus assault and sexual harassment and would make schools “more dangerous.”

She signaled that her group would fight the guidelines from taking effect.

“Betsy DeVos and the Department of Education, hear us loud and clear: attacks on Title IX are attacks on students’ dignity and safety – and we will not tolerate it,” she said.

PHOTO: Meghan Downey of Chatham, N.J., protests as Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announces changes in federal policy on rules for investigating sexual assault reports on college campuses in Arlington, Va., Sept. 7, 2017.The Washington Post via Getty Images, FILE
Meghan Downey of Chatham, N.J., protests as Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announces changes in federal policy on rules for investigating sexual assault reports on college campuses in Arlington, Va., Sept. 7, 2017.

At issue are the federal guidelines for Title IX, the civil rights law that prohibits gender discrimination in any education program that receives federal funding. Under that law, sexual harassment and assault if a form of unlawful discrimination. If schools reject the guidance, they can lose billions of dollars in federal assistance.

One of the biggest changes to the rule would be a new definition of sexual harassment. Under Obama, it was defined it as “unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature.” The new rule would define sexual harassment as unwanted sexual conduct that is “so severe, pervasive and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the recipient’s education program or activity.”

That definition would likely dramatically narrow the number of harassment cases a college or university would consider because the victim would have to show that the misconduct prevents them from receiving an education or participating in an activity. The Education Department says it based its definition on a 1999 Supreme Court case that held student-on-student sexual harassment could constitute discrimination.

The guidelines also require that any alleged harassment “must involve conduct that occurred within the school’s own program or activity.” That could include off-campus activities if they are tied to the school.

Another major change would guarantee someone accused of sexual misconduct would be given the right to cross-examine their accuser, but only through an intermediary such as an adviser or an attorney.

The proposal follows a bruising Supreme Court confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who was accused of sexual assault at a house party when he was in high school three decades earlier. Kavanaugh vehemently denied the account and was subsequently endorsed by the Senate in a narrow 50-48 vote.

Helping to lead the effort under DeVos has been Candice Jackson, who wrote a 2005 book detailing assault allegations against former President Bill Clinton. She later swung behind Trump’s candidacy despite reports that he faced his own allegations of sexual assault.

An earlier version of this story quoted the Education Department’s definition of sexual harassment based on a preliminary draft document. The agency’s final proposal defines sexual harassment as denying “equal access” to an education program or activity.

Snow moves into Northern Plains as Midwest, Northeast brace for arctic cold

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

Winter weather alerts are in place across nine states on Saturday as a clipper system will deliver snow from the Rockies through the Central Plains into the Great Lakes.

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Slick travel conditions are to be expected Saturday morning.

Snow associated with a cold front is being pushed to the south by an arctic high pressure system to the north. The snow will begin in Wyoming and move south through the day, ending in Colorado and northern Kansas. Another area of snow will be working through the Great Lakes region Saturday.

PHOTO: Winter storm warnings and winter weather advisories are in place on Sunday.ABC News
Winter storm warnings and winter weather advisories are in place on Sunday.

Snowfall totals in the Rockies will be 1 to 3 inches throughout the area and up to a foot in higher elevations.

Further east, the snow associated with the low pressure brings will generally bring 1 to 3 inches of snow to parts of Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois. There will be slippery driving conditions during the early part of the day.

PHOTO: Parts of the Great Lakes and inland Northeast will receive a small amount of snow on Sunday. ABC News
Parts of the Great Lakes and inland Northeast will receive a small amount of snow on Sunday.

A weak cold front will push across the Great Lakes and bring light snowfall into interior New England through Sunday.

Snowfall accumulations are expected to be low, but roadways will be slick, especially overnight Sunday into early Monday when there is the risk for re-freezing.

PHOTO: Wind chills will be in the 20s and 30s across much of the eastern U.S. on Sunday morning.ABC News
Wind chills will be in the 20s and 30s across much of the eastern U.S. on Sunday morning.

It will be cold on Sunday for a majority of the country due to the arctic air being ushered in by the high pressure in the Plains. Wind chills will be in the 20s Sunday morning in New York City. It will feel like minus 8 degrees in Ely, Minnesota.

Swimmer in Australia dies after being stung by stingray

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

A swimmer in Australia has died of a heart attack after he was stung by a stingray.

Police say the 42-year-old man went into cardiac arrest on Saturday at Lauderdale Beach, east of Hobart in Tasmania, after he suffered a puncture wound to his lower abdomen.

He was swimming alone and close to shore when the attack happened. Friends pulled him from the water but failed in attempts to resuscitate him.

The incident recalled the 2006 death of “The Crocodile Hunter” Steve Irwin while filming an underwater scene for a television series, when a stingray’s stinging barbs pierced his heart.

Fraternity suspended after member critically injured in fall

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

A student at West Virginia University is in critical condition after a fall at the school’s Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house — leading to the suspension of the chapter pending an investigation.

David Rusko, 22, remains in the intensive care unit after the fall on Nov. 10. The school said Rusko appears to have fallen down a set of stairs at the home and was knocked unconscious. It then took two hours for his fellow frat members to call an ambulance, the school said.

“Officers have discovered that more than two hours lapsed between Rusko’s fall and the 911 call,” according to a press release from the school.

The senior is a finance major from Uniontown, Pennsylvania.

PHOTO: A student was critically injured in a fall at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon house on the campus of West Virginia University on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018.WTAE
A student was critically injured in a fall at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon house on the campus of West Virginia University on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018.

Eric Dyson, the property manager for the building, told Pittsburgh ABC affiliate WTAE, “It appears that he had taken a misstep on the staircase. There was no organized function or anything like that. A couple of guys were playing pool upstairs.”

WATE reported Rusko underwent surgery on Friday.

West Virginia said Thursday it had placed “a number of students on interim suspension, and additional students may face disciplinary action” over the incident.

“I am deeply disappointed in the apparent actions and inactions of these students, and the decisions that were made,” Dean of Students Corey Farris said in a statement. “As our investigation moves ahead, we remain very concerned about David’s condition. He will continue to be in our prayers.”

PHOTO: Eric Dyson, the property manager for the Sigma Alpha Epsilon building at West Virginia University, said video appears to show student David Rusko tripping and falling down the stairs on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018.WTAE
Eric Dyson, the property manager for the Sigma Alpha Epsilon building at West Virginia University, said video appears to show student David Rusko tripping and falling down the stairs on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018.

The school said Rusko is a member of the fraternity and was visiting to watch the school’s football game against TCU.

The national chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon ordered the cease-and-desist for the WVU chapter as an investigation is conducted.

“As soon as we learned of this accident, we immediately opened an investigation and are working closely with the University as part of its review,” Sigma Alpha Epsilon said in a statement. “We have also instructed the chapter members to cooperate fully with law enforcement in its investigation.”

PHOTO: A student was critically injured in a fall at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon house on the campus of West Virginia University on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018.WTAE
A student was critically injured in a fall at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon house on the campus of West Virginia University on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018.

West Virginia University, under President Gordon Gee, has cracked down on the behavior of fraternities in the wake of a student’s death in 2014. Gee placed a moratorium on “all social and recruiting activities” for 16 fraternities in February, including Sigma Alpha Epsilon, calling it a “tipping point” for behavior among the chapters.

A minimum GPA of 2.75 was instituted for all frat members, in addition to rules for new pledges, and a review by the school led to the suspensions of four fraternities this fall. Sigma Alpha Epsilon was not among them, but it was hit with “various restrictions, including limits on social activities and requirements for hazing and alcohol education,” according to the school.

The University of Iowa suspended its chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon last month, one of nine frats at the school suspended over breaking a moratorium on alcohol.

Argentine submarine found at bottom of Atlantic after year of searching

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

An Argentine submarine that went missing almost exactly one year ago has been found at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

The Argentine Navy and Defense Ministry confirmed late Friday evening that the remains of the ARA San Juan submarine had been located in the south Atlantic Ocean at a depth of about 800 meters (approximately a half mile), about 700 miles due east of the Argentine city of Puerto Madryn.

The families of the 44 crew members who perished in the accident have been summoned to Mar del Plata Naval Base to be officially informed this weekend.

Officials in the South American country lost radio contact with the San Juan on Nov. 15, 2017 and were unable to locate the missing sub in following days and months.

The sub was discovered Friday by U.S. company Ocean Infinity, which was in charge of the search operation. The company sent out mini-submarines to the seabed and one returned with definitive photo evidence of the wreckage of the submarine. In the deal the Houston-based company made with the Argentine government, finding the wreckage of the submarine would trigger a payment of $7.5 million.

PHOTO: Antonio Niz, father of first Corporal Luis Niz, holds a collage of images of his son, a crew member of the missing ARA San Juan submarine, as family members stand outside Russias embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, Jan. 15, 2018.AP
Antonio Niz, father of first Corporal Luis Niz, holds a collage of images of his son, a crew member of the missing ARA San Juan submarine, as family members stand outside Russia’s embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, Jan. 15, 2018.

The same company struck a similar deal with the Malaysian government to find Malaysia Airlines flight 370 earlier this year — but came up empty in its search.

Utilizing the Norwegian ship Seabed Constructor, the 40-member team of specialists from Ocean Infinity set sail on Sept. 8 and were on their last day of work before heading back to port when they received indications of a 60-meter long wreckage or geological formation at a depth of 800 meters. They had already studied two dozen other such possibilities to no avail.

PHOTO: This undated photo provided by the Argentina Navy shows an ARA San Juan, a German-built diesel-electric vessel, docked in Buenos Aires, Argentina.Argentina Navy via AP
This undated photo provided by the Argentina Navy shows an ARA San Juan, a German-built diesel-electric vessel, docked in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Three personnel from the Argentine Navy and four persons representing the families were also on board Ocean Infinity’s search vessel. Luis Tagliapietra, father of missing crew member Alejandro, told ABC News just two days ago that he was tired and frustrated as the ship began to head back to port after over two months of searching.

Attempts at communication with Tagliapietra or other family members aboard the search vessel were unsuccessful on Friday night.

The federal judge investigating the San Juan accident, Marta Yáñez, was optimistic about the potential for research into the disaster with the newly discovered images: “It’s one thing to do guesswork, it’s a whole different matter to analyze the images we have so specialists can assess what really happened.”

PHOTO: Relatives of the ARA San Juan crew with hands chained look on during a protest in front of the Casa Rosada demanding the government to continue the search for the lost submarine on June 28, 2018 in Buenos Aires.Patrick Haar/Getty Images
Relatives of the ARA San Juan crew with hands chained look on during a protest in front of the Casa Rosada demanding the government to continue the search for the lost submarine on June 28, 2018 in Buenos Aires.

A number of naval officials are under investigation for allegedly allowing the submarine to go on an extended mission when they had been warned of mechanical problems that warranted immediate attention, according to testimony in federal court.

Adm. Marcelo Srur, the head of the Argentine Navy, was axed last December in the wake of the submarine going missing.

The ship was taking part in a military exercise at the time it lost contact, and had just seven days worth of oxygen on board.

Trump heads to California to see wildfire damage, meet with firefighters

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

President Trump surveyed the devastation from the California wildfires on Saturday, touring a neighborhood in badly-ravaged Paradise and another in Malibu, where the homes were reduced entirely to rubble.

“This is very sad to see,” Trump said as he stood with the governor, the mayor of Paradise and other local officials on a destroyed street in Paradise. “As far as the lives are concerned, nobody knows quite yet.”

“As big as they look on the tube you don’t see what’s going on until you come here,” Trump said of the scale of the destruction and the impact of seeing the damage in first person.

“Nobody would have ever thought this could have happened,” Trump said, as he pledged the full support of the federal government in the recovery efforts.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump arrives at Beale Air Force Base in California, Nov. 17, 2018, as he travels to view wildfire damage.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
President Donald Trump arrives at Beale Air Force Base in California, Nov. 17, 2018, as he travels to view wildfire damage.

Asked if seeing the destruction has changed his perspective on climate change, the president said it had not, and instead repeatedly pointed to forest management as a key factor in fire prevention moving forward.

“No, I have a strong opinion. I want a great climate and we’re going to have that,” Trump said. “And we’re going to have forests that are very safe. Because we can’t go through this every year.”

During a meeting with fire and local officials at an incident command center in Chico, the president referred to the fire as a “monster” and applauded firefighters who are “fighting like hell” to put out the remaining parts of the fires still burning.

PHOTO: Residences leveled by the wildfire line a neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018.Noah Berger/AP
Residences leveled by the wildfire line a neighborhood in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 15, 2018.

The raging wildfires have already claimed at least 74 lives and up to 1,000 people are still missing. The Camp Fire in Butte County, which killed at least 71 people, is considered the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in the state’s history.

When the president arrived in California beneath hazy, smoke-filled skies Saturday, he was greeted by FEMA Director Brock Long, Gov. Jerry Brown and the governor-elect, Gavin Newsom.

In a tweet, Brown, who has feuded with Trump on several issues, welcomed the president to his state.

“Tomorrow @GavinNewsom and I will join @POTUS during his visit to the state,” he tweeted Friday. “Now is a time to pull together for the people of California.”

Camp Fire
SLIDESHOW: Massive wildfires engulf California

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Trump said he’ll be stopping at two of the most devastated areas, and applauded the firefighters for being “unbelievably brave” as they’ve battled the fires.

The president also reiterated his criticism — which first appeared as a tweet — that poor fire management is to blame for the severity of the fires, and pointed to Finland as an example of how to better maintain forests.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump views damage from wildfires in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
President Donald Trump views damage from wildfires in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.

“We do have to do management maintenance and we’ll be working also with environmental groups, I think everyone’s seen the light,” Trump said. “The floors of the forest are very important. You look at other countries where they do it differently and it’s a whole different story. I was with the president of Finland, and he said we have a much different — we’re a forest nation. He called it a forest nation. And they spend a lot of time on raking and cleaning and doing things and they don’t have any problem.”

Trump added that it could have been “a lot different situation” if we had been talking about forest management earlier. “It should have been done many years ago but I think everybody is on the right side. It’s a big issue,” he said.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump visits the charred wreckage of Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park with FEMA head Brock Long, right, in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.Leah Millis/Reuters
President Donald Trump visits the charred wreckage of Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park with FEMA head Brock Long, right, in Paradise, Calif., Nov. 17, 2018.

Though the president asserted that there is agreement on the issue of forest management, California officials, including a top-ranked fire official, have slammed his criticism. California Professional Firefighters President Brian Rice called Trump’s assertion of forest management “ill-informed, ill-timed and demeaning to those who are suffering as well as the men and women on the front lines.”